Don’t Overlook GoDaddy Premium Listings When Selling Domains Registered On GoDaddy

Often when people talking about listing domains for sale, Sedo and Afternic come up in discussion. While those are the two largest domain marketplaces and you can list any domains there, there’s a unique option for domains registered at GoDaddy that may even produce bigger results: GoDaddy Premium Listings.

What are GoDaddy Premium Listings?

GoDaddy Premium Listings are GoDaddy’s method of allowing sales listings directly on the domain search path on their site. You can only add premium listings to domains within your GoDaddy account, and they only allow .com, .net and .org domains. When a domain sells, GoDaddy automatically handles the sale, collecting the funds from the buyer and transferring the domain into their account.

What is the benefit of having a GoDaddy Premium Listing?

To really understand the benefit of these listings, take a look at what happens when someone searches for a domain on GoDaddy:

GoDaddy Premium Listings

The circled areas show where GoDaddy Premium Listings can show on a domain search on GoDaddy

As you can see, premium listings can not only show right up top if you have an exact match for the search, but can also show in the list of related premium listings further down (which on my 1920×1080 resolution shows just above the fold).

Your domain sales listing shows right when someone is looking to buy a domain on the most popular domain site on the web. It’s the exact kind of exposure you want for your domains!

What do you pay for a GoDaddy Premium Listing?

You pay nothing upfront to have your domains premium-listed. If your domain sells, GoDaddy takes a 30% commission. They have at times offered month-long periods when you could create a 20%-commission premium listing as well, but currently, creating a premium listing will come with the 30% commission level.

How do you add a GoDaddy Premium Listing to your domain

There are two ways to add a premium listing to a domain, and both involve going into the Domain Manager area in your account (hover over “Domains” at the top left and click “Domain Management” in the drop-down menu):

1. Add a listing to an individual domain: Search for the domain in your account, then click on it to bring up its management area. Under “Domain Enhancements”, you’ll see “Premium Listings” – click on “Learn More/Add”. You’ll be prompted to give a price for the domain and proceed to add the premium listing to your shopping cart (as a $0 product).

2. Add listings to domains in bulk: Hover over “Buy/Sell” at the top and click on “Premium Listings”. Then click the “Add Domains” button at the top right. On the window that comes up, you’ll be able to list out the domains in your account you want to list along with their pricing. Then proceed to add the listings to your cart.

Do GoDaddy Premium Listings really work?

Yes, they do. We’ve sold two domains through premium listings in the past 3 days. It is really some of the best exposure you can get for your domains for sale. There are many reasons why we keep many of our domains registered at GoDaddy, and GoDaddy Premium Listings is certainly a big one.

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11 Comments on “Don’t Overlook GoDaddy Premium Listings When Selling Domains Registered On GoDaddy”

  1. Paul Mc says:

    Hi Steve. Very useful posts, many thanks. Can you use Sedo and Go Daddy premium at the same time? And for different selling prices?
    Cheers.

    • Steve Jones says:

      Hi Paul – thanks for the comment! Actually, you can’t have both at the same time because SedoMLS is partnered with many registrars who are NOT GoDaddy.

      To explain, this deal between them lists domains from SedoMLS listings if they match the person’s search, so they would not show in the GoDaddy Premium Listings at the bottom (as far as I’m aware), so it’s not ALL the benefits of a GoDaddy Premium Listing. That said, Sedo’s partner registrars all involve immediate automatic transfer of domain when it’s sold – any domains they sell through GoDaddy wouldn’t have that. A domain registered at GoDaddy can’t be listed on SedoMLS so there can’t be both listings at the same time.

      Hope that helps!

      -Steve

  2. Pred says:

    cheers Steve
    I see you come top for this search, above godaddy, lol

    i have had people offer through gd broker before and sold a few that way
    just sold one yesterday through premium, came in out the blue
    once for a nice sum too
    30% does kill as estate agents in the uk only charge about 1% !
    however i factored this ito price
    I was just looking to see what happens next as got an email from gd to say sold
    i guess they wait for buyer to pay, or do they have to pay right away?
    then I am hoping they pay me by paypal as escrow is fine for people I don’t know but godaddy is safe as houses
    just the $ to £ exchange, UK banks take like 10% or more, sometimes much more as ‘banks exchange rate’ is different to one you see on xe.com etc, that is tourist rate

    how did you get paid? sure saw an option somwhere to say paypal
    btw I don’t like godaddy’s recent site update once logged in, pain in ass
    cheers
    Pred

    • Steve Jones says:

      Hey Pred,

      We receive payments from sold premium listings by check. I just looked and that’s still the only option they give (if the domain sells in GoDaddy Auctions, you get paid through PayPal if it’s less than $1,000 or through Escrow.com if it’s $1,000 or more).

      They pay net 45 days after the month the domain sold, so 45-75 days after the sale happens depending on when in the month it happens. They indicate part of that is for fraud protection as I believe they accept credit card even for larger transactions that other marketplaces wouldn’t.

      We have had transactions fall through due to either fraud or the buyer indicating they didn’t realize they were paying more than registration fees for the domain. This was before they changed the way premium listings show on searches, so I think it’s a lot more obvious now that it costs more.

      As far as exchange rate goes, they don’t seem to take a lot, maybe 2% or so. Their recent site update is taking a little getting used to, but their past ones have too and eventually it becomes second nature if you use it enough.

      Thanks for the comment/questions!

      -Steve

  3. Pred says:

    cheers Steve
    well I got notification yesterday and checked whois and is already in buyers name! and not in my account, so I think they wait until buyer pays and then notify you a deal going on lol
    the buyer is ceo of a major u.s company so it’s all going to go through fine I think.
    damn thats a longtime to wait for payment
    I am in UK, so a ‘check’ in U.S dollars is about as much use as an ashtray on a motorbike.
    I will have to speak to support and see what other options there are as that’s not an option.
    it’s going to have to be paypal or escrow or wire
    I’ll keep you posted
    cheers
    Guy
    ps: what figure did yours sell for? what stage is sale at?

    • Steve Jones says:

      Hey Guy,

      As far as GoDaddy’s notification of a sale, that is indeed once the buyer pays. In fact, the premium listing transactions happen similarly to registering a name – same shopping cart process and everything, so the sale doesn’t even start getting processed until GoDaddy has received funds I believe.

      I would assume if your account is set in pounds that they would pay you in pounds, but you should probably check with them. Let me know what they say – I’d be curious to know what they say.

      Our sales that I mentioned were in the $x,xxx range.

      -Steve

  4. Thanks for the article.

    I have just bought a domain name with the hope of selling it on. In your experience how good would you say the godaddy recommended price calculator is? The domain name I bought wasn’t cheap and godaddy puts the recommended price at almost the same as what I paid for it!

    • Steve Jones says:

      Hi John,

      Honestly no automated appraisal is worth looking at to determine either sale or purchase price for a domain. Names we had showing $96 and $140 for GoDaddy recommended price sold for $2,497 and $2,797 respectively.

      The key is that these are people looking to buy a domain, and generally will have searched for your specific domain to see your premium listing, so figure they will be a motivated end-user buyer and price the domain accordingly.

      -Steve

  5. Jeepers says:

    Hi Steve! Remember me, I purchased LiverpoolFootball.org from you back in December…I’ve finally developed the site, and I’m building a following day by day, so thanks again for that!

    I purchased a domain a few months back because I thought it was a good deal, I paid around 5 bucks for it (It’s a .co). I recently listed it with GoDaddys Premium Listing for $999. We’ll see if anyone bites; if a sale goes through, I’ll be back to comment and reinforce your analysis. Thanks again, and keep up the good work as always!

    • Steve Jones says:

      Hi Gary! Nice to hear from you again. Your site on LiverpoolFootball.org looks very nice! I’m sure that will work out well for you.

      One thing I’ve realized about premium listings since I had posted this is that while other extensions may be indicated as premium under the primary result of your search (i.e. the row of 10 extensions showing there) and would show up in the lower Premium Listings area, it will only show at the very top if it’s exactly what you searched for. Given GoDaddy’s search is for .com by default, that would explain why most Premium Listings we’ve sold and that I’ve heard others sell have been .com.

      A .co could certainly still sell through Premium Listings, but you’ll rarely have that spot at the top of the results page which is where I believe most Premium Listings have been selling from.

      I’m going to be making another post about Premium Listings soon as I have a little more insight now about them after having done some more research.

      Thanks for the comment and update on your site!

      -Steve

  6. Sharon Hayes says:

    Reblogged this on Sharon Hayes Dot Com.


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